Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

Courtesy+of+Melinda+Smith
Courtesy of Melinda Smith

Courtesy of Melinda Smith

Student

Student

Courtesy of Melinda Smith

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Intro and conclusion by Lucy C. ’18, 3rd period J1

Recently, nine students and two teachers made up a visiting delegation from one of our sister schools, Colegio Santa Ursula, in Lima, Peru. The group came for a two-week visit in an exchange- partnership between the two schools which has been active since 2007.
The group spent this part of their summer holidays visiting Dallas attractions such as the Bush Library, Sixth Floor Museum, and Aquarium along with sitting in on classes. Some girls also went with their host sisters to Mavericks games and American fast food restaurants.
During their last week in the United States, seven girls talked to an Ursuline journalism class about themselves and some of their experiences in America.

Emilea M. ’20, Abbi S. ‘20

Rafaella Garcia, a 16-year-old swimmer and tennis player on the delegation, noticed how much less traffic there is in Dallas than Lima. She’s been to other places in America such as New York City, Disney World, and Washington DC, but this is Rafaella’s first visit to Dallas and she loves it so far.
Although she loves the fast food hamburgers here, she said she still really loves Peruvian food. She said that while she’s in the states, she wants to buy makeup and American chocolate to bring home with her. So far, she’s gone to North Park, Fort Worth, and the Galleria to go ice skating and has enjoyed all of it.
When Valeria Sotelo flew in from Peru, she had no idea she would soon be eating the wonders of Chili’s chocolate chip skillet cookie. Her Peruvian friends also had no idea about the greasy delicacy of Whataburger or even Chik-Fil-A. That has all changed.
Although Valeria enjoys Dallas she would rather be at home in Lima with her family. She longs to listen to One Direction and Five Seconds of Summer and watch The Fault in Our Stars. She has, however, come to appreciate Texas’ hot and dry weather instead of Lima’s humid climate.
At home in Lima, Valeria likes to draw in her free time. During the warmer months, her family visits the beaches ten kilometres away. While Dallas has been an adventure, Valeria is excited to return to her many drawings of mandalas and visit the beach.

Jackie T. ‘20

Ana Paula Tirado,15, is an older sister and lover of history. She was surprised when she came to Dallas about almost everything- the weather, the food, the houses, even the Netflix! She laughingly said that her biggest disappointment in the U.S. is that her favorite Peruvian shows were not on American Netflix, and she couldn’t show them to her host sister.
Also, the size of food portions here in Texas blew her away. She said that, although she’s enjoyed the American fast food on her trip, nothing could replace her beloved Peruvian food. Specifically, she loves ceviche, a delicious dish served commonly along Peru’s coast.
However, for all the differences between our countries, there is one universal similarity: protective parents. Like American teens, Ana Paula has experienced her parent’s worries about her being out alone or out at night. With 7 million more citizens than Dallas, the bustling streets of Lima often can be dangerous, and Ana Paula complained that she couldn’t drive in Peru until age 18.
A little different and a little similar, Peru and Dallas were brought together this month by our Ursuline Global Partnership. It allowed Ana Paula to experience our food, school, culture, and Netflix!

Mia V. 18, Isabella A. ‘18

Mechita (Rosa Falcon) is loving Dallas, and it’s only her seventh day here! Since being in Dallas, she has chowed down on Whataburger, visited the Aquarium, and even taken a weekend trip down to San Antonio!
But despite all these activities, Mechita still considers this to be a relaxing vacation.
Mechita is a part of Peru’s national synchronized swimming team, and let us tell you, it is no easy sport! every morning at 5 a.m. Mechita wakes up so she can be at the pool, practicing from 6-7. Then she heads to school, which starts at 7:45, and then back to practice for four more hours of training. During these hours, the swimmers rotate between pool training, ballet classes, and gymnastics. All this, and she’s the youngest on the team by two years.
Mechita noticed that the biggest difference between Ursuline and Santa Ursula is that they have nine 45 minute classes a day, opposed to our four 120 minute classes. Also, they don’t get a free period, so their only free time at school is during lunch.
Back at home Mechita has a twin sister named Maria. They look alike, but they aren’t identical. They also have two small dogs named Chloe and Luna.
As far as the cities themselves, she said, Lima is also very different. Mostly everything is in walking distance (she can walk to her school in five minutes and her pool in ten) and they also mostly live in apartments—kind of like New York. In her free time, when she has some, Mechita will meet up with friends and walk to the mall for some shopping, go grab a Starbucks, or head to the Cinema.
Another main difference is the food. Due to her practice schedule, Mechita doesn’t usually get to eat dinner. Also, in Peru the portions are considerably smaller than the ones here in Texas, so she finds it particularly difficult to finish even one burger from Whataburger or a full lunch from Sage!

Emma H. ‘20

It has always been a dream for Isabella Pomarino to come on this exchange trip. When she was young her sister mentioned it to her and now she’s living that childhood dream.
Isabella enjoys tennis, shopping, and makeup. Makeup is a huge part of Isabella’s life. Some of her favorite brands are Too Faced, Urban Decay, and many more.
When Isabella isn’t in a tennis match, hitting up her favorite stores, or applying a perfectly shaped winged eyeliner, she is hanging out with her group of friends that she loves dearly.
Isabella said one of her favorite things she has done here so far was getting her nails done with her host.
Back in Lima, Isabella has a 20-year-old sister. Since her sister can drive, Isabella can usually get a ride from her sister for some ice cream.
“This trip has been so fun, I wish I could stay even longer, “she said.

Abigail M. ‘20

Maria Alejandra Mendiola, 16, laughed at Abigail M.’s American pronunciation when she asked about all the “lamas” in Peru. “Llamas,” Maria corrected, and told Abigail that while there are llamas in Peru, they are located in a different region.
Even though llamas are not part of the Peru where Maria lives, there are many fun things she likes to do in Lima like shop with her friends at Larcomar, the massive shopping center where Maria says “you can find everything.” The thing Maria misses most from back home is the food, especially ceviche.
Also when referencing home, she enthusiastically talks about her 8-year-old sister and a poodle. Maria said she is also passionate about fashion, but she says that new trends take a month to get to Peru.
Along with her love of fashion, Maria is also interested in architecture, and hopes to study it in college. She listens to a lot of American music, but she also likes reggaetón music which is mix of hip hop, Latin American, and Caribbean music. Her favorite celebrities are Cameron Dallas and Selena Gomez.

Kate J. ‘20

Fernanda Villalba said that she really enjoyed going to a Dallas Mavericks game with her host family and eating all sorts of delicious fast food.
“Still,” she confessed, “my favorite food is one from home called aíi de gallina that my mom makes for our family.”
Fernanda talked about her favorite things at school in Peru. She said that besides the breaks, every student’s favorite, she really liked the legends and ghost stories that accompanied the school building.
“There is this black chair in the auditorium,” she said with shining eyes. “It is believed that if you sit there, you might die.”
Fernanda also said that while she will be glad to return to Peru and see her family that she has immensely enjoyed her time here, especially with her host family and new found sister Lauren M.

Overall, our Peruvian sisters were very impressed with the hospitality of Dallas people, but admitted that prior to coming here, they had a few preconceived ideas about Texas life (no, everyone does not live on a farm with cowboys). They seemed to have also grown a liking to our fast food, including Chick-fil-A and Whataburger. The girls also enjoyed the quieter atmosphere of Dallas compared to all the noise in Lima, and they noticed how many more people live in houses here rather than apartments.
Considering all the differences between our lifestyles, it was surprising how many similarities there were between modern culture in Peru and America. The girls dressed in similar fashions, and listened to English music artists along with some Spanish. This proved that although our lifestyles may be a bit different, global relations like these show that we aren’t so different after all.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

    England

    Wilmington comes to Dallas

  • Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

    School Features

    Humanities Day Held By English Department Inspires Students

  • Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

    News

    Russian Critic Murdered Outside Ukrainian Hotel

  • Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

    News

    Trump’s Budget Cuts Meals on Wheels

  • Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

    News

    New Rangers Stadium Announced

  • Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

    Opinions

    Why We Chose the All-Girl Environment

  • Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

    School Features

    Looking Forward to Humanities Day

  • Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

    Sports and Wellness

    UA Alum Features: Marathon Runner Jordan Snyder

  • Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

    Entertainment

    Survival Life of Apps

  • Peru Delegation’s Thoughts

    Partner Schools

    Upcoming Spring Delegations